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Managing Long-Term and Late Effects

Many long-term and late effects of treatment can be managed. Work closely with your doctor and follow these tips to help keep long-term and late effects at bay: Keep a record of any physical or emotional symptoms you experience and discuss them with your treatment team. Keep all medical records, including dates and locations of cancer treatment, drugs and supportive therapies (such as blood transfusions) and doses and specific sites and amounts of radiation therapy. Keep copies of b ...

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Long-Term And Late Effects Of Treatment For Childhood Cancer Survivors

Treatment for childhood blood cancer may consist of chemotherapy and other drug therapies and may also include radiation therapy or allogeneic stem cell transplantation. There are risks for long-term and late effects common to all of these treatments, and these may include problems with learning, fatigue, bone or joint pain and an increased risk for developing a secondary cancer.  Some long-term and late effects become evident with maturation (puberty), growth and the normal aging p ...

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Long-Term and Late Effects For Cancer Survivors

Blood cancer survivors don't always have serious long-term or late effects of treatment. For those who do, some long-term effects, such as fatigue, can linger for months or years after therapy. Late effects, such as medical conditions like heart disease and other cancers, don't appear until years after treatment ends. Effects can range from mild to severe. Talk with your doctor about possible long-term and late effects. Your risk for developing long-term or late effects can be influenced ...

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Returning to School

Consider educating family members, friends, school personnel and healthcare providers about your child's possible long-term and late effects of treatment. In particular, talk with teachers about your child's needs before he or she returns to school, as they and other school personnel may not be aware of the potential for long-term and late effects of treatment. Work with your child's teachers and healthcare providers to develop a program tailored to his or her needs that features: ...

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Be Your Child’s Advocate

Parents may need to educate other family members, friends, school personnel and healthcare providers about long-term and late effects. Here are some steps parents can take: Talk to your child's doctors and discuss the potential for long-term and late effects, as well as an ongoing plan to evaluate potential effects of treatment. Keep a record of physical and emotional symptoms that your child experiences and discuss them with your child's treatment team. Make sure that your child' ...

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