Grant Finder

LLS investigators are outstanding scientists at the forefront of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research at centers throughout the world. Search to see the many research projects that LLS is currently funding.

Grant: 5458-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-4876

Year: 2016

Project Title: Plasticity Of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells With IDH Mutations

Project Summary:

Leukemia is a type of cancer caused by uncontrolled growth of blood cells. The bulk of leukemia cells can be killed with therapy, but most leukemia patients succumb due to the re-growth of therapy-resistant cells. Leukemia cells can develop therapy resistance due to their adaptability to different conditions. The adaptability of leukemia cells compared to normal blood cells may be caused by their unstructured DNA, which is an informational strand that contains a blueprint for the cell. Specifically, leukemia cells have lost the ability to neatly wrap their DNA around tiny spools.

Grant: RTF6003-17 | RTFCCR/ LLS Patient-Focused Immunotherapy Research Grant for Blood Cancer:

Location:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Year: 2016

Project Title: Targetable Bases Of Immune Evasion In Lymphomas Of The Primary Central Nervous System And Testes

Project Summary:

Specific subtypes of large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL), including primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) and primary testicular lymphoma (PTL), present as localized masses in non-lymphoid organs. PCNSLs and PTLs, which both arise in sites that were previously considered to be immune sanctuaries, have inferior responses to current empiric treatment regimens. In fact, PCNSLs are considered incurable with standard therapies.

Grant: 5453-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10087

Year: 2016

Project Title: Targeting The Histone Demethylase LSD1 In Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Project Summary:

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a group of blood cancers with a high mortality rate. Unfortunately, treatment for this disease has not changed significantly in over three decades. Recent progress has been made in identifying key epigenetic drivers in AML. DNA is wrapped around histone proteins and the addition or removal of a methyl group from sites on these proteins can modulate gene expression. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is one such epigenetic enzyme that removes methyl groups from histone proteins.

Grant: 2314-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10087

Year: 2016

Project Title: Investigating And Targeting Diverse Kinase Alterations Driving Systemic Histiocytic Neoplasms

Project Summary:

Histiocytic diseases are a group of blood disorders that affect both children and adults and can lead to severe disability and death. Until recently, there were no effective treatments for the more severe forms of these diseases in adults. However, it was recently discovered that about half of these patients have a mutation in a gene called BRAF and that treating these patients with a medicine that blocks this mutation results in astounding benefits for these patients.

Grant: 8002-17 | New Idea Award (NIA):

Location:The Regents of the University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0009

Year: 2016

Project Title: Reprogramming Anti-cancer T Cells Using A Genetic Mutagenic Chain Reaction

Project Summary:

Immune-based tumor therapy works by relieving the natural control mechanisms of the immune system thus unleashing potent killer T cells that can destroy cancerous tissues. The limitations thus far are that only one or two of the known control mechanisms have been targeted, and the therapies are successful for only a few cancers and in only a minority of patients. The objectives of this project are to use new genetic tools applied in novel ways to produce T cells that have been relieved of multiple inhibitory feed-back mechanisms.

Grant: 8005-17 | New Idea Award (NIA):

Location:University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455

Year: 2016

Project Title: Reversing CD8 T Cell Tolerance In Vivo

Project Summary:

T cells control tumors, but cancer occurs because T cells are subject to tolerance, or non-responsiveness. Hence, tolerance is an enormous barrier to immunotherapy, because cancer-specific T cells are turned off. Recent immunotherapies, such as CAR T cells, have revolutionized treatment, but they require extra-ordinary efforts. The challenge is to overcome immune non-responsiveness in a targeted fashion in vivo, such that only cancer-specific T cells are turned on and other immune cells are still off.

Grant: 6513-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10087

Year: 2016

Project Title: Targeting Epigenetic Alterations In MDS Stroma That Drive Disease Progression

Project Summary:

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous set of clonal disorders characterized by ineffective blood cell development. These diseases are driven by many complex genetic and non-genetic changes. Recent findings have uncovered that alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment contribute to the disease. In our preliminary data, we have found that the beta-catenin pathway is activated in the bone marrow and in the blood of patients with MDS and this predicts a poor clinical outcome.

Grant: 6519-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024

Year: 2016

Project Title: Prevention Of Relapse After Stem Cell Transplantation By Minor H Antigen T Cell Immunotherapy

Project Summary:

In order to survive, many patients with blood cancers such as leukemia or lymphoma require ‘allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation’ in which they receive blood-forming cells from a healthy donor after particularly aggressive radiation and/or drug therapy. Cures are, in part, related to immune cells from the donor, called T cells that are transplanted along with the donor stem cells and can attack any remaining cancer cells.

Grant: 6521-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Fondazione per la Ricerca e la Cura dei Linfomi nel Ticino, , Ticino

Year: 2016

Project Title: Novel Small Molecule Targets FLI1 In Lymphoma And T-ALL

Project Summary:

Despite important therapeutic improvements achieved in the last years with targeted and immunotherapeutics, too many patients affected by lymphoma still have incurable disease. Thus, new personalized therapeutic strategies are still needed. 

Grant: 5457-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-4413

Year: 2016

Project Title: Determine The Role Of The Nuclear Matrix In Hematopoietic Cell Transcription And Development

Project Summary:

Chromatin, the cellular DNA with its associated proteins, is packed tightly in the nucleus. The precise physical organization of the chromatin is believed to be important in gene expression, but poorly understood. We have found that a complex of proteins associated with a crucial transcriptional regulator for blood development (Bcl11a) interacts with Matrin-3, a major component of the nucleus matrix. Matrin-3 has been known for its role in maintaining chromatin structure, but recent studies suggest it may also more directly impact gene regulation.