Grant Finder

LLS investigators are outstanding scientists at the forefront of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research at centers throughout the world. Search to see the many research projects that LLS is currently funding.

Grant: 6446-13 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Year: 2012

Project Title: Targeting Genetically-driven P53 And Cell Cycle Deregulation In DLBCL

Project Summary:

In spite of advances in the molecular understanding of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), clinical models are still used to identify high-risk patients who then receive empiric therapy. We have defined a comprehensive genetic signature of p53 deficiency and deregulated cell growth in DLBCL. This genetic signature predicts outcome and suggests targeted treatments. We propose to assess this genetic signature in a large independent series of DLBCLs, and evaluate a promising targeted treatment in the laboratory and in animal models in preparation for a clinical trial.

Grant: 1593-13 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The Regents of the University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143

Year: 2012

Project Title: MicroRNA Regulation Of Lymphocyte Growth And Effector Functions

Project Summary:

Helper T cells are the central coordinators of immune responses. When called into action, they multiply and acquire the ability to deploy inflammatory proteins to fight infections. Recent discoveries in the field of gene regulation uncovered an entire class of important molecules, called microRNAs, that had previously escaped detection. These discoveries were celebrated with the awarding of a Nobel Prize to Andrew Fire and Craig Mello in 2006. In our own previous work, we discovered that microRNAs are absolutely critical for the immune function of helper T cells.

Grant: 5056-12 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:CA-29/248 University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-

Year: 2012

Project Title: Identification And Chemical Modification Of The RNA Ligase Implicated In MM

Project Summary:

Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the blood that kills approximately 10,000 people a year in the United States. This disease is currently considered incurable and 5-year survival rates are 35%. Recent advances in our understanding of how multiple myeloma develops suggests that dysregulation of a cellular system that senses imbalances in a cells ability to produce secreted proteins such as antibodies is important for the initiation of the disease.

Grant: 5101-12 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL

Year: 2012

Project Title: Mouse Models Of Chromosomal Instability And Tumorigenesis

Project Summary:

Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, occurs often in leukemias and lymphomas and is associated with poor prognosis. Aneuploidy is generated when chromosomes do not segregate properly during cell division. Many tumors frequently mis-segregate chromosomes in a process termed chromosomal instability (CIN). Understanding the role of CIN in cancer may allow us to develop therapies to selectively target unstable tumor cells while preserving stable normal cells.

Grant: 5314-12 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10027

Year: 2012

Project Title: Targeting Glucocorticoid Resistance In T-ALL

Project Summary:

T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy that results from the leukemic transformation of immature T-cell progenitor cells. Glucocorticoids play a central role in the treatment of T-ALL due to their capability to inhibit proliferation and induce death in leukemia cells. Thus, the development of glucocorticoid resistance in leukemic patients is an important clinical problem and a significant contributor to therapeutic failure.

Grant: 6253-13 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-3001

Year: 2012

Project Title: Targeting Transposase Domains For Leukemia Therapy

Project Summary:

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is most common in elderly patients, yet it is rarely curable in those patients. The advances seen in treating AML in the last few decades have not been applicable to elderly patients. Indeed, in some studies chemotherapy has essentially no effect, because the leukemias in these patients are highly resistant to chemotherapy. How these leukemia cells resist chemotherapy, and resume proliferation after treatment, is not completely understood. Most chemotherapeutic drugs kill leukemia cells by damaging their DNA.

Grant: 6007-12 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21203-6428

Year: 2012

Project Title: Pattern Recognition Receptors And T-cell Leukemia Progression

Project Summary:

The American Cancer Society estimates that nearly 9,000 new cases of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma T-cell leukemia/lymphoma were diagnosed in 2009. Overall, T-cell leukemia has poor prognosis and few effective therapeutic options. T Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. Approximately 15% and 25% of the newly diagnosed cases of ALL in children and adults are T-cell ALL, which has been linked historically to poor prognosis.

Grant: 6081-12 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:The Regents of the University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143

Year: 2012

Project Title: Improving FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

Project Summary:

Our understanding of molecular events that lead to cancer has led to a new generation of treatments that specifically target proteins that play a critical role in carcinogenesis. A new era of “targeted therapies”, which can be both highly effective and well-tolerated, was ushered in with the clinical success of drugs that target BCR-ABL, the protein that causes chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). BCR-ABL belongs to a family of genes known as tyrosine kinases, and it has become clear that many tyrosine kinases are mutated and activated in a broad range of cancers.

Grant: 6360-13 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:The Regents of the University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143

Year: 2012

Project Title: Crenolanib And Ponatinib For The Treatment Of FLT3-ITD-positive AML

Project Summary:

Despite tremendous advances in our understanding of mutations associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), no highly effective new therapies have been approved in decades. FLT3 is a commonly mutated genes in the leukemic cells of AML patients (25-30% of AML cases). “In tandem duplication” (ITD) mutations in FLT3 (“FLT3-ITD”) are associated with a particularly poor prognosis. The FLT3 protein has an enzymatic activity that can be inhibited by small molecules. We have recently demonstrated that FLT3-ITD is a valid target for therapy in human AML.

Grant: 6163-12 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10027

Year: 2012

Project Title: The Genetics Of Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas

Project Summary:

Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a group of hematologic tumors that encompasses different subgroups. Overall, 30-50% of PTCLs are diagnosed as PTCL-NOS (not otherwise specified), an hereogeneous and poorly defined group characterized by chemotherapy resistance and a very poor prognosis. Despite the urgent need to identify new therapeutic targets for the treatment of these lymphomas, almost nothing is known regarding the genetic lesions and oncogenic mechanisms active in PTCL-NOS.