Grant Finder

LLS investigators are outstanding scientists at the forefront of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research at centers throughout the world. Search to see the many research projects that LLS is currently funding.

Grant: 8003-17 | New Idea Award (NIA):

Location:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Year: 2016

Project Title: Development Of Small Molecules That Induce Degradation Of Leukemia Oncoproteins

Project Summary:

The prevailing approach to drugging oncoproteins through direct targeting of the activity of the mutant protein has been met with limited success for aml. we are pursuing an innovative approach that focuses on promoting aml oncoprotein degradation. proteins are tagged for degradation by addition of polyubiquitin chains, however oncoproteins can be rescued from degradation by deubiquitylating enzymes (dubs), which cleave ubiquitin from substrate proteins.

Grant: 8000-17 | New Idea Award (NIA):

Location:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Year: 2016

Project Title: Targeting Chromatin Compaction In AML

Project Summary:

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults. Survival in adults with AML is dismal (less than 25%) and is even lower in older people. Our treatment approach hasn’t improved much in the last 30 years, so new strategies are desperately needed. We know that AML is a disease of DNA. For example, specific mutations found in AML cell DNA are not seen in other cells from the patient. However, we think that the physical structure of DNA itself could also be part of how leukemia develops.

Grant: 6502-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8327

Year: 2016

Project Title: Targeting Antigenic Substrates In Monoclonal Gammopathy

Project Summary:

n spite of extensive efforts, the underlying cause of many blood cancers including myeloma remains unknown. Myeloma is a common blood cancer wherein tumor cells make a specific antibody. Nearly all cases of myeloma originate in a precursor state called monoclonal gammopathy and there is an unmet need to develop new approaches to prevent clinical cancer. The risk of myeloma is particularly increased in patients with Gaucher Disease, an inherited disorder that leads to the accumulation of fat molecules.

Grant: 6524-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Univ of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78229-3900

Year: 2016

Project Title: Targeting The Tumor Cell And The Microenvironment In DLBCL

Project Summary:

The development of new vasculature to support tumor grown, angiogenesis, is a cancer hallmark. In diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoid cancer in adults, enhanced angiogenesis associates with an unfavorable outcome. However, we have limited understanding of contribution of the lymphoma cell to this aberrant vessel development in the tumor microenvironment. Addressing this knowledge gap could facilitate the development of rational therapeutic strategies that concomitantly target the tumor cell and its growth-supporting microenvironment.

Grant: 6521-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Fondazione per la Ricerca e la Cura dei Linfomi nel Ticino, , Ticino

Year: 2016

Project Title: Novel Small Molecule Targets FLI1 In Lymphoma And T-ALL

Project Summary:

Despite important therapeutic improvements achieved in the last years with targeted and immunotherapeutics, too many patients affected by lymphoma still have incurable disease. Thus, new personalized therapeutic strategies are still needed. 

Grant: 5457-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-4413

Year: 2016

Project Title: Determine The Role Of The Nuclear Matrix In Hematopoietic Cell Transcription And Development

Project Summary:

Chromatin, the cellular DNA with its associated proteins, is packed tightly in the nucleus. The precise physical organization of the chromatin is believed to be important in gene expression, but poorly understood. We have found that a complex of proteins associated with a crucial transcriptional regulator for blood development (Bcl11a) interacts with Matrin-3, a major component of the nucleus matrix. Matrin-3 has been known for its role in maintaining chromatin structure, but recent studies suggest it may also more directly impact gene regulation.

Grant: 5451-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Year: 2016

Project Title: Personalizing Leukemia Therapy By Determining Drug-induced Early Death Signaling

Project Summary:

Recent progress in cancer research has been marked by the continuing development of exciting drugs that selectively target vulnerabilities present only in cancer cells, so-called targeted therapies. Too often, however, we are lacking the proper predictive biomarkers, tools for identifying which patients will benefit most from individual targeted therapies. When cancer cells die in response to exposure to targeted agents, it is usually due to the drugs tricking the cancer cells into committing suicide via a pathway called “apoptosis”.

Grant: 5449-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:New York University Medical Center, New York, New York 10016

Year: 2016

Project Title: Investigating The Mechanism Of Alternative Non-homologous End Joining In Mammalian Cells

Project Summary:

DNA is a person’s blueprint, containing all of the genetic “information” needed by the cells in his or her body to make the proteins needed for life. But, over time, DNA can break, which may result in the information being lost or corrupted. Following information loss, the cells may fail to correctly make necessary proteins, and this failure may result in, or advance, cancer. However, cells contain “pathways” that can repair these DNA breaks so that information is not lost, and the blueprint remains intact. Two major pathways are well understood.

Grant: 2316-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Year: 2016

Project Title: Immune Therapeutic Intervention In High-risk Smoldering Myeloma

Project Summary:

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a cancer that is almost always preceded by a precursor asymptomatic condition named smoldering myeloma (SMM). Treatment is initiated when patients develop symptomatic disease. The 2-year rate of progression in patients with high-risk SMM is 50%, indicating that almost all of these patients will develop end-organ damage before receiving therapy. This concept of initiating therapy at the time of symptomatic disease is analogous to initiating therapy in patients with solid tumors only after the development of measurable metastatic disease.

Grant: 8001-17 | New Idea Award (NIA):

Location:The Regents of the University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143

Year: 2016

Project Title: APOBEC Mutagenesis: A Causal Link Between Infections And Childhood ALL?

Project Summary:

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a blood cancer that is the most common type of cancer in childhood. Children with a high number of infections in their first year of life have an increased risk of developing ALL later in childhood. This suggests that infections may cause ALL but how this might occur is not yet understood. Recent studies that sequenced DNA from ALL tumor samples have revealed a specific pattern of DNA changes in some cases that is known to be caused by a protein called “APOBEC”.