Grant Finder

LLS investigators are outstanding scientists at the forefront of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research at centers throughout the world. Search to see the many research projects that LLS is currently funding.

Grant: 6526-18 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63112-1408

Year: 2017

Project Title: Improving Risk Assessment Of AML With A Precision Genomic Strategy To Assess Mutation Clearance

Project Summary:

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is the most common form of acute leukemia in adults. More than 20,000 people developed AML in the US in 2015, with ~11,000 deaths.  Although most people who get the disease achieve an initial remission, the majority relapse and eventually die from their disease, usually within two years of presentation.  For two decades, the chromosomal profile of AML cells examined at presentation has been used to help predict the risk of relapse. If that risk is high, patients benefit from a stem cell transplant performed during the first remission.

Grant: 6545-18 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-3149

Year: 2017

Project Title: Targeting Notch In B Cell Lymphoma/leukemia

Project Summary:

Remarkable progress has been made in the treatment of CLL and other B cell tumors such as mantle cell lymphoma, but to date none of these treatments result in cures, and new therapies are needed. Our group has a longstanding interest in targeting the Notch pathway as a cancer treatment strategy. Recently, mutations in Notch genes have emerged as being among the most important causes of CLL and other B cell tumors.

Grant: 6547-18 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000

Year: 2017

Project Title: Targeting Stromal Cell-derived Gremlin1 To Control Multiple Myeloma Disease Development

Project Summary:

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a bone marrow (BM) cancer of antibody producing plasma cells (PC). MM PCs are thought to spread throughout the BM in a manner similar to the way in which solid tumours spread. However, which cells and/or factors within the BM are important in helping PCs establish and grow, remains largely unknown. Using newly developed microscopic and genetic marking techniques: we have shown that there are very few sites within the BM that are capable of supporting the growth of PC tumours.

Grant: 6538-18 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210

Year: 2017

Project Title: Novel Strategies For The Therapy Of Genomic High Risk CLL

Project Summary:

Cancers such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are characterized by a slow accumulation of a specialized kind of white blood cell called a B-lymphocyte. It starts in the bone marrow and spills over to accumulate in the blood, lymph node, liver and spleen. The reason CLL is problematic is that the leukemic B-cells are non- functional and live for a long time either because they have proteins that help them survive for a long time or lose proteins that normally would cause them to die.

Grant: 1345-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-9003

Year: 2017

Project Title: MicroRNAs In Myeloid Leukemia Development And Resistance To Chemotherapy

Project Summary:

Mutations in genes that control cell growth and survival are commonly found in leukemia. In the case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) there is often a mutation in a gene called FLT3 that causes it to be activated all the time and promote disease. However, there are many aspects of how this mutated gene is able to promote AML that remain unclear, making it challenging to design and develop new therapies against this devastating condition. My lab studies a newly discovered class of molecules, called microRNAs, which are altered in diseases such as leukemia.

Grant: 6553-18 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:IRIC - Institut de Recherche en Immunovirologie et en Cancerologie, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7

Year: 2017

Project Title: RUNX1 Mutations That Confer Exquisite Sensitivity To Glucocorticoids

Project Summary:

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease caused by several genetic alterations, including mutations in the RUNX1 gene. The presence of RUNX1 mutations in AML cells is generally associated with bad prognosis for these AML patients, and RUNX1 mutations are also the cause of Family platelet disorder, which predisposes these patients to AML development. In order to discover novel cures for patients suffering from RUNX1-mutated AML, we identified glucocorticoids as effective drugs that kill AML cells carrying RUNX1 mutations.

Grant: 5468-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:New York University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-415026

Year: 2017

Project Title: Understanding The Function Of 3D Chromatin Topology In Myeloid Disease

Project Summary:

Greater understanding of the fundamental mechanisms promoting the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may help researchers develop new treatment approaches targeting these mechanisms. Chromosomes (collections of DNA and their associated proteins) are heritable and dynamic carriers of genetic information. Chromosomes are constantly looping, and these structural changes shape the gene expression pattern of a cell. This 3D genome landscape, known as genome topology, provides the physical structure required to inform the identity and function of a cell.

Grant: 1351-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210

Year: 2017

Project Title: Understanding And Overcoming Resistance To Bruton Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Project Summary:

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia and until recently was treated with therapies toxic to the patient. Our clinical and research team at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center helped provide critical information which led to the FDA approval of ibrutinib, a less toxic targeted therapy. Ibrutinib inhibits the BTK protein, which is a protein that CLL uses for its own pathological survival. Ibrutinib shows remarkable clinical activity that is more durable than any therapy ever studied in CLL.

Grant: 3374-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-3149

Year: 2017

Project Title: Functional Characterization Of The Mutant Calreticulin-MPL Interaction In Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

Project Summary:

Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are a group of rare blood cancers that occur when the body produces too many white blood cells, red blood bloods, or platelets. Though the overall prognosis for MPN tends to be favorable, more advanced forms of these diseases can lead to severe anemia, increased risk of blood clots, and transformation to leukemia. MPN were first described in 1951 by hematologist William Dameshek, but the underlying genetic cause of these diseases remained a mystery for over 50 years.

Grant: 5474-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637

Year: 2017

Project Title: Transcriptional And Epigenetic Roles For β-catenin In The Genomic Instability And Oncogenic Transformation Of T-cell Leukemia/lymphoma

Project Summary:

Cancer arises from changes in DNA, and these changes can come in various forms. In the case of leukemia and lymphoma, most have genomic instability, meaning the normal organization of DNA (the genome) is disrupted due to improper repairing of DNA breaks. DNA is organized into structures known as chromosomes, and changes to normal chromosomal structure is evidence of genomic instability in a cell.