Researchers & Healthcare Professionals

www.lls.org/researchershealthcareprofessionals

From Omics to Clinics: Using New Technologies to Advance Diagnosis and Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies

Target Audience: This activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of hematologists, oncologists, and other healthcare professionals who have an interest in the study and treatment of hematologic malignancies.

Access Virtual Lecture via:

  • CMEUniversity.com (click here)
    • Internet Release Date: March 3, 2014
    • CME Credit Available Until: March 3, 2015
    • CE Credit Available Until: September 3, 2015
  • freeCME.com (click here)
    • Internet Release Date: March 12, 2014
    • CME Credit Available Until: March 18, 2015
    • CE Credit Available Until: September 18, 2015

Activity Purpose

To educate hematologists, oncologists, and other professionals about the role of studies that utilize genome-wide sequencing of patient samples and other high-throughput cellular technologies in the diagnosis and treatment of hematologic malignancies. The program also aims to help researchers and clinicians improve their understanding of emerging ethical, legal, and privacy issues surrounding data shared from human participants in research studies and patients treated in clinical practice.

Education Objectives

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Applying Next Generation Sequencing Technologies to Hematologic Malignancies - The Next Era-Module 1
    Elaine R. Mardis, PhD
    Education Objectives
    After completing this activity, the participant should be better able to:
    1. Describe next generation methodologies for cancer genome sequencing
    2. Apply principles of genome sequencing to determine clonal evolution patterns in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)  patients with relapse
    3. Outline a plan for AML next generation sequencing in clinical practice
  • Genomic Approaches to Target Aberrant Transcription in Leukemia-
    Module 2

    Kimberly Stegmaier, MD
    Education Objectives
    1. After completing this activity, the participant should be better able to:
      Identify challenges in targeting aberrant transcription
    2. Summarize novel omic approaches for discovering new therapeutic targets and small molecule therapies
    3. Evaluate differentiation therapy as an alternative approach to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment
  • Therapeutic Strategies in Lymphoma from Functional and Structural Genomics-Module 3
    Louis M. Staudt, MD, PhD
    Education Objectives
    1. After completing this activity, the participant should be better able to:
      Outline important signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of activated B-cell (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)
    2. Summarize clinical trial data for B-cell receptor blockade with Ibrutinib in patients with ABC DLBCL
    3. Describe potential novel synergistic combination therapies for ABC DLBCL
  • Functional Genomic Approaches for Delivery of Personalized, Targeted Therapies-Module 4
    Jeffrey W. Tyner, PhD
    Education Objectives
    After completing this activity, the participant should be better able to:
    1. Describe the elements necessary for developing personalized targeted therapy
    2. Explain functional screening processes used to determine potential therapeutic targets in leukemia patients
    3. Outline an algorithm for integrating functional and genomic data to improve patient outcomes
  • Genomic Testing in Clinical Practice ? Privacy, Ethical and Legal Considerations and Ethics and Informatics Informed Consent for Cancer Research in the 21st Century: It's Complicated and Panel Discussion and 
    Q & A-Module 5
    Samuel L. Volchenboum, MD, PhD, MS and Eric Kodish, MD
    Education Objectives
    After completing this activity, the participant should be better able to:
    1. List the factors to consider when discussing genomic testing with patients
    2. Summarize the benefits and challenges of genetic screening in children and adults
    3. Apply the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics recommendations for reporting incidental findings in clinical genome sequencing
    4. List prerequisites and communications steps for informed consent in genomic testing
    5. Outline a model for obtaining clinical trial informed consent from parents of children with leukemia
    6. Describe the implications of the Learning Health Care System on patient care

Faculty

Cheryl L. Willman, MD
The Maurice and Marguerite Liberman Distinguished Chair in Cancer Research
Professor of Pathology and Internal Medicine
Director & CEO
University of New Mexico Cancer Center
University of New Mexico School of Medicine
Albuquerque, NM

Elaine R. Mardis, PhD
Professor of Genetics and Molecular Microbiology
Co-Director, The Genome Institute at Washington University
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO

Kimberly Stegmaier, MD
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Harvard Medical School
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston Children's Hospital, Broad Institute
Boston, MA

Louis M. Staudt, MD, PHD
Director
Center for Cancer Genomics
National Cancer Institute
Bethesda, MD

Jeffrey W. Tyner, PhD
Assistant Professor
Oregon Health & Science University
Portland, OR

Samuel L. Volchenboum, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Computation
Director, Center for Research Informatics
The University of Chicago Medicine
Comer Children's Hospital
Chicago, IL

Eric Kodish, MD
F.J. O'Neill Professor and Chairman, Department of Bioethics
Director, Center for Ethics, Humanities and Spiritual Care
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, OH

Sponsors and Supporters

This activity is jointly sponsored by The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), Postgraduate Institute for Medicine, and RMEI, LLC. Funding provided by LLS and supported by educational grants from Celgene Corporation and Millennium: The Takeda Oncology Company.

last updated on Thursday, March 20, 2014
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