ACHIEVING CURES FOR MYELOMA

Most people diagnosed with myeloma are over 50 years old. The disease is more common in men than women, and the incidence is twice as high in African Americans as white Americans.

Our vision is that, one day, all patients with myeloma will either be cured or will be able to manage their disease so that they can experience the highest quality of life possible.

ACHIEVING CURES FOR MYELOMA

Most people diagnosed with myeloma are over 50 years old. The disease is more common in men than women, and the incidence is twice as high in African Americans as white Americans.

Our vision is that, one day, all patients with myeloma will either be cured or will be able to manage their disease so that they can experience the highest quality of life possible.

About Myeloma

Myeloma is a type of blood cancer that begins in the bone marrow. It forms in the body’s plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell that normally helps to fight infections. When myeloma cells multiply beyond control and overtake the normal plasma cells, they cause serious medical complications.

In 2018, it is estimated that more than 30,000 people will be diagnosed and almost 13,000 people will die from myeloma. Today, almost 120,000 people are living with, or in remission, from myeloma.

While the disease remains incurable, treatment advancements over the past decade are resulting in better overall survival, and new therapeutic approaches are being studied. Still, there is much work to be done.

To address this urgent, unmet medical need, LLS is taking a multi-pronged approach to improve outcomes for patients, by investing in scientific research as well as education and outreach efforts to improve patient access to the most promising, cutting-edge treatments.

Learn More

Almost 120,000 people are living with, or in remission from, myeloma today

The 5-year relative survival rate of myeloma is 51%

Last year, LLS committed $34.5 million to myeloma research

LLS has distributed nearly $164 million in co-pay assistance to myeloma patients since 2007

Signs and symptoms

Diagnosis

Treatment

Speak to a specialist (IRC)

Caregiver support

Clinical Trials

give now. Save lives

Cynthia Sims, Myeloma Survivor

In 2015, I was on a family vacation when I began experiencing back pain so severe that I had to be in a wheelchair for the rest of my trip. Upon my arrival home, I scheduled an appointment with my doctor who referred me to an oncologist. After several tests, I was diagnosed with myeloma. I was devastated.

Chemotherapy and radiation soon followed, along with horrible side effects, sleepless nights and countless blood transfusions. But I was not going to let cancer defeat me. I remembered a quote, “Cancer is a word, not a sentence,” and thought “OK, I got this.” I felt spiritually strong.

In August 2016, I had an autologous bone marrow transplant using my own stem cells. I also participated in an immunotherapy clinical trial, the day after my transplant. It was an extremely difficult time, and this experience gave a new meaning to the word “sick.”

Since the transplant and the trial, I am doing much better. I’m in remission, and now on maintenance treatment.

I’m thankful to The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) who not only funded one of the treatments that helped save my life, but has also been a valuable support system. LLS provided me with the information, support and encouragement I needed. I decided to become an LLS volunteer and help others the way LLS helped me: by giving hope. I volunteer through LLS support groups and Myeloma Link, a program that aims to improve access to education and treatment for myeloma in the African American community. I also participated in my first Light The Night Walk last fall, which gave me an overwhelming feeling of accomplishment.

Every day that I survive is a blessing and a victory. If you ever feel that you’ve come to the end of your rope, remember to tie a knot and hang on!

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