Grant Finder

LLS investigators are outstanding scientists at the forefront of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research at centers throughout the world. Search to see the many research projects that LLS is currently funding.

Grant: 5464-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, California 92037

Year: 2017

Project Title: The Impact Of Immunoglobulin Isotype (IgM Vs IgG) On B Cell Lymphomagenesis And Progression.

Project Summary:

B-cell lymphomas continuously multiply because growth regulation signaling is altered to stay ‘on’ all the time. This signaling is normally triggered by activation of proteins called receptors on the cell surface. Most lymphomas require signaling from a group of receptors called the B-cell receptor (BCR). Normal B-cells produce a type of BCR, called immunoglobulin (Ig), in a process called the germinal center (GC) reaction. There are several types of Ig subtypes – IgM, IgG, and IgA isotypes—which are produced during the GC in response to stimuli generated by agents foreign to the body.

Grant: 1352-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:New York University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-415026

Year: 2017

Project Title: MicroRNA Regulation Of Leukemia Stem Cells

Project Summary:

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is composed of two populations of cells with differing characteristics. The bulk population directly gives rise to the disease symptoms. The second population is very small and is composed of leukemia stem cells (LSCs), whose role is to initiate disease and generate the AML bulk population. These self-renewing LSCs are therapy resistant and mediate disease relapse; therefore, it is critical to understand the mechanisms that regulate LSCs in order to develop strategies designed with the intent to cure. 

Grant: 3371-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637

Year: 2017

Project Title: Single-cell Technologies To Dissect 5hmC And 5mC Heterogeneity In Normal And Malignant Hematopoiesis

Project Summary:

Blood cells arise from stem cells found in our bone marrow. Through a process called differentiation, stem cells develop into the diverse blood cell types with their various functions. Cells of the same blood subtype are often thought of as homogeneous populations, but this extreme simplification imposes limitations on our ability to understand normal and malignant blood cells. Therefore, it is critical to understand the more complicated reality of blood cell diversity.

Grant: 5472-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:British Columbia Cancer Agency Branch, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3

Year: 2017

Project Title: Roles Of MicroRNA MiR-146a In Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

Project Summary:

Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a cancer of blood stem cells, the blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. In MDS, cancerous blood stem cells lose the ability to make blood cells, and can also block the function of the remaining normal blood cells. Aging and environmental factors are associated with developing MDS, but how these processes affect the function of both cancerous and coexisting normal blood stem cells in MDS remains poorly understood.

Grant: 2317-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis , Missouri 63130

Year: 2017

Project Title: Targeting Leukemia Stromal Interactions In T-ALL

Project Summary:

T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a subtype which comprises about 20% of all cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. T-ALL is a particularly rare disease in adults, with only about 600 new cases per year in the United States. Furthermore, the prognosis of adults is poor; only 40% of adults with T-ALL are cured with current treatments.

Grant: 5469-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10022

Year: 2017

Project Title: Mutations Disrupting Gene Enhancer Epigenetic Complexes As Drivers Of Lymphomagenesis.

Project Summary:

Lymphoma is a form of cancer that affects immune cells called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. There are many subtypes and maturation stages of lymphocytes and, therefore, many kinds of lymphomas. Follicular lymphomas (FL) develop from B lymphocytes (B-cells) and are the second most common subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Clinically, FL is an indolent lymphoma, characterized by slow progression and relatively high overall survival rate.

Grant: 5463-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, California 92037

Year: 2017

Project Title: TET Proteins In B Cell Function And Malignancy.

Project Summary:

DNA methylation is a fundamental biological process that controls the activation state of genes, which represent basic modules of biological systems. TET proteins were recently identified as enzymes that mediate the removal of DNA methylation and have been shown to play vital roles in normal development of organisms. Moreover, the activity of TET enzymes is often deregulated during the pathogenesis of various hematological and non-hematological cancers.

Grant: 3376-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-9003

Year: 2017

Project Title: Determining The Role Of SIRT5 In Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Project Summary:

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most deadly blood cancer, with more than 70% of patients dying from the disease within five years after diagnosis. The treatment option shave remained largely unchanged for the past 30 years. Chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are still the standard therapy for AML. The fact that most patients with AML will eventually relapse and succumb to their disease defines an urgent, unmet medical need for more effective drugs to treat this disease. To answer this call, we have taken a novel approach to identify new drug targets.

Grant: 1349-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63112-1408

Year: 2017

Project Title: Protection Of Proliferating B Lymphocytes From Transformation By A C-MYC-induced Tumor Suppressive Program

Project Summary:

Lymphomas and leukemias are caused by uncontrolled proliferation of lymphocytes due to accumulating errors in the genome. However, cell proliferation is also an important biological activity across many different tissues and cell types. Specifically, proliferation of lymphocytes is essential for the immune responses that protect individuals from invading pathogens. Normal lymphocytes are able to proliferate even quicker than cancer cells in response to infection for extended periods of time.

Grant: 3378-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10087

Year: 2017

Project Title: Optimizing CAR T Cell Therapy For Multiple Myeloma

Project Summary:

While advances have recently been made in the management of multiple myeloma (MM), MM is still considered incurable, with most patients dying from their disease. Thus, there is a critical need to identify and evaluate new therapeutic modalities that may induce durable remissions or cures.

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