Grant Finder

LLS investigators are outstanding scientists at the forefront of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research at centers throughout the world. Search to see the many research projects that LLS is currently funding.

Grant: 1145-10 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27708

Year: 2010

Project Title: Glucose Metabolism In Cell Signaling And Survival In Leukemia

Project Summary:

It has been known for more than 80 years that cancer cells have increased metabolism compared to their normal counterparts. This characteristic has been the basis for F18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, a technique currently used to identify a variety of tumors, including both lymphoma and leukemia. While it remains unclear how this unique form of metabolism affects development and treatment of cancer, this understudied feature of cancer biology may provide new approaches to cancer therapy.

Grant: 2173-10 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois 60693

Year: 2010

Project Title: Translational Biology Of Multiple Myeloma Cancer Stem Cells

Project Summary:

Neoplastic plasma cells are the hallmark of multiple myeloma (MM) and their clonal expansion is responsible for the clinical manifestations of the disease. We have found that myeloma plasma cells are terminally differentiated and lack the capacity for sustained clonogenic growth. Instead, myeloma plasma cells appear arise from self-renewing and drug resistant clonotypic B cells that can faithfully recapitulate disease in immunodeficient mice.

Grant: 1018-10 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Mayo Clinic Rochester, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55486-0334

Year: 2010

Project Title: Function Of An Ubiquitin Ligase In The Maintenance Of Genome Integrity

Project Summary:

In eukaryotic cells, genomic DNA is packaged into chromatin, an organized complex of DNA and proteins that regulates diverse cellular processes including DNA replication and gene transcription. It has been well documented that alterations in proteins involved in chromatin function result in leukemia. The long-term goal of my laboratory is to understand how a chromatin state is inherited during S phase of the cell cycle. Currently we are using the yeast S. cerevisiae to address this fundamental, but poorly understood, question.

Grant: 2194-10 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-4876

Year: 2010

Project Title: Manipulating The Tumor Niche As A Therapeutic Strategy For Multiple Myeloma.

Project Summary:

Tumor cells are interdependent on their microenvironment for their propagation. In multiple myeloma (MM), tumor cells reside in the bone marrow and are regulated by specialized “niches” responsible for their growth and survival. Therefore identifying components of this niche and developing strategies to target the niche are crucial towards curing MM. Here we propose strategies to identify genes and proteins of importance within this niche responsible for propagating MM with the intent of identifying and defining a “tool box” of niche modifying reagents.

Grant: 1029-10 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Leland Stanford Junior University, San Francisco, California 94144-4253

Year: 2010

Project Title: The Rb Gene Family In The Hematopoietic System

Project Summary:

The RB tumor suppressor normally inhibits cell division; when RB is mutated, cells proliferate too much and are more likely to become fully cancerous. RB function is lost in a large number of human blood cancers; to study how RB normally prevents blood cancers, we genetically engineered mice to delete RB and its two cousins, p107 and p130, in blood stem cells. We found that the blood stem cells, which are normally slowly-dividing and reside in the bone marrow, proliferate abnormally and are not retained in the bone marrow in the mutant mice.

Grant: 1216-10 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037

Year: 2010

Project Title: Characterizing SUMO-targeted Ubiquitin Ligases For Use In Leukemia Therapy

Project Summary:

There is a clear need for more effective and safer ways to treat leukemia. Current therapies can often kill the majority of cancer cells, but disease recurrence (relapse) is all too common. We have a long-standing interest in the protein “machines” that maintain/repair our genome and thus block cancer priming genetic changes. Importantly, studies on these machines can also provide promising new targets for therapy, as evidenced by our recent discovery of a protein family called STUbL.

Grant: 5660-11 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The Regents of the University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94704-5940

Year: 2010

Project Title: The Role Of Structured Elements Within Human 3`UTRs In MiRNA-mediated Regulation

Project Summary:

The amount of each protein present in the body at a given time is tightly regulated. When this regulation goes awry, healthy cells can become cancerous. In the last decade it was discovered that specific small pieces of ribonucleic acid (RNA), termed microRNAs, found inside our cells are capable of tightly controlling the levels of certain proteins by binding to the messenger RNAs that code for them. Subsequently, it was discovered that changes to microRNA levels can lead to several types of cancer, including B-cell lymphomas.