Grant Finder

LLS investigators are outstanding scientists at the forefront of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research at centers throughout the world. Search to see the many research projects that LLS is currently funding.

Grant: 1340-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Regents of the University of Michigan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15251-2131

Year: 2016

Project Title: Development Of Pharmacologic Agents To Target Leukemia Stem Cells

Project Summary:

Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) die from the disease despite achieving initial remission upon treatment. Emerging evidence shows that recurrence of the disease results from the activity of leukemia stem cells (LSCs), which are capable of self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation into malignant blasts. LSCs are resistant to current treatments and novel drugs killing leukemia stem cells are urgently needed. The polycomb group (PcG) proteins play an essential role in maintaining the self-renewing capacity of leukemic stem cells.

Grant: 8004-17 | New Idea Award (NIA):

Location:Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90027

Year: 2016

Project Title: Cell Surface Glycan Differences As Biomarkers For Leukemic B-cell Precursor Cells.

Project Summary:

Promising new cancer therapies are based on our ability to find biomolecules on the surface of cancer cells that are not present, or only present on non-essential, normal cells. although scientists have identified a few of these, this has not been easy, and biomolecules identified to date are mainly proteins. many people are not aware of the fact that all cells are covered by a dense layer of carbohydrates that is actually more extensive than the protein layer.

Grant: 8008-17 | New Idea Award (NIA):

Location:Arizona Board of Regents, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721-0158

Year: 2016

Project Title: Improving The Diagnosis Of Febrile Neutropenia In Hematopoeitic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

Project Summary:

Before bone marrow transplant patients can receive their new bone marrow, their existing immune system must be destroyed or it will reject the transplant. In the time period before their transplant takes hold and a new immune system is established, patients are susceptible to infections caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses. As a result, patients must be treated with antibiotics or risk dying because their immune system is compromised.

Grant: 6515-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637

Year: 2016

Project Title: Therapeutic Targeting Of Anemia In MDS By Modulation Of DOCK4 Pathway

Project Summary:

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) are a group of blood diseases that are characterized by severe anemia and over time can lead to leukemia. Currently there is only one FDA approved drug for MDS but most patients do not respond to the drug and therefore new treatments are surely needed. Our recent work identified a protein named DOCK4 that is present in low amounts in certain patients with MDS. We showed that due to the low amounts of this protein these patients has a shorter lifespan and suffers from anemia.

Grant: 6514-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637

Year: 2016

Project Title: Modeling Myeloid Malignancies Mediated By Germline RUNX1, ETV6, And ANKRD26 Mutations

Project Summary:

Most cancers of the bone marrow are thought to arise spontaneously, but some develop in people who are predisposed to such tumors by virtual of their inheritance of a familial genetic mutation, or DNA change, that is passed from one generation to the next.  Although once thought to be extremely rare, inherited forms of leukemias and lymphomas are likely to be much more common than previously described.

Grant: R6506-17 | Translational Research Program (TRP):

Location:Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York 10029

Year: 2016

Project Title: Treatment Strategies For MPN By Targeting The Tumor Suppressor P53

Project Summary:

The myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and myelofibrosis (MF), affect over 200,000 individuals in the United States. The drugs currently used to treat PV and ET reduce the risk of thrombosis and hemorrhage, relieve symptoms, but do not prevent evolution to  MF or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation provides an opportunity for cure but, only a fraction of patients with advanced MF are appropriate for this option.

Grant: 3367-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1S8

Year: 2016

Project Title: Targeting VCP/p97 As A Therapeutic Strategy In Multiple Myeloma

Project Summary:

The viability of multiple myeloma cells is dependent on protein quality control processes. Approaches based on inhibition of key players in this process, such as the proteasome via bortezomib, have been used successfully to treat blood cancers. p97/VCP (valosin-containing protein), one of the most abundant mammalian proteins, is central for regulating various aspects of protein quality control and DNA repair. Inhibition of p97 has recently been suggested as an alternative therapeutic avenue to treat multiple myeloma, with potential even in cases of resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

Grant: RTF6000-17 | RTFCCR/ LLS Patient-Focused Immunotherapy Research Grant for Blood Cancer:

Location:Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030

Year: 2016

Project Title: Multi-tumor Antigen-targeted T Cell Therapy For AML

Project Summary:

This application seeks to harness the killing capacity of the immune system to eliminate acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML is a frequently diagnosed blood cancer that is in need of new therapies, as patient suffering from high-risk disease have little chance of cure. To achieve our goal of developing an effective immunotherapy for AML we will utilize a specific type of immune cell called T-cell, which has a natural ability to seek out and kill malignant cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Hence, this type of approach is both safe (non-toxic) and highly effective.

Grant: 5454-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

Year: 2016

Project Title: Mechanisms Linking Centrosome Amplification To A Pro-invasive Secretory Program And Cancer.

Project Summary:

In many types of cancers, including blood cancers, tumor cells contain extra copies of a cellular structure called the centrosome. Centrosomes assemble a structural network of filaments known as microtubules that is involved in cellular processes such as secretion and migration. We recently demonstrated that the acquisition of extra centrosomes hyperactivates Rac-1, the tumor-promoting, small G-protein, which can drive metastasis. However, the mechanistic link between extra centrosomes and Rac-1-mediated metastasis remains unclear.

Grant: 2314-17 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10087

Year: 2016

Project Title: Investigating And Targeting Diverse Kinase Alterations Driving Systemic Histiocytic Neoplasms

Project Summary:

Histiocytic diseases are a group of blood disorders that affect both children and adults and can lead to severe disability and death. Until recently, there were no effective treatments for the more severe forms of these diseases in adults. However, it was recently discovered that about half of these patients have a mutation in a gene called BRAF and that treating these patients with a medicine that blocks this mutation results in astounding benefits for these patients.