Grant Finder

LLS investigators are outstanding scientists at the forefront of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma research at centers throughout the world. Search to see the many research projects that LLS is currently funding.

Grant: 1347-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10087

Year: 2017

Project Title: Uncovering The Dysregulated RNA Binding Protein Network In Normal And Malignant Hematopoiesis

Project Summary:

Although molecular targeted therapy has dramatically changed how we treat cancer, the treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains focused on the use of cytotoxic drugs with many patients eventually relapsing with their disease. One of the major drivers of resistance is the persistence of cells that retain the immature properties of stem cells. Cancer cells are made up of proteins expressed by the genes in the nucleus of the cell. Many RNA molecules comprise the information that is the intermediary between genes and proteins.

Grant: R0859-18 | Quest for CURES (QFC):

Location:Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10022

Year: 2017

Project Title: Targeting Of The Senescent Vascular Niche To Treat Age-related Hematopoietic Malignancies.

Project Summary:

Physiological aging directly leads to a multitude of age-related diseases, including cardiovascular disease, arthritis and cancer, that affect nearly all systems of the body. The goal of this proposal is to identify alterations in the aged bone marrow vascular system that initiate and facilitate the progression of hematopoietic malignancies. We have demonstrated that vascular cells are a critical component of the bone marrow microenvironment and support the overall health and fitness of blood stem cells.

Grant: 5460-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10087

Year: 2017

Project Title: Defining The Molecular Determinants Of Cysteine Acquisition And Redox Homeostasis In B Cell Lymphoma

Project Summary:

A key feature of blood cancer cells is the adaptation of their internal cellular metabolism to support nutrient utilization for continuous cell proliferation. Excessive nutrient consumption results in increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since increased ROS levels are toxic, there must be countermeasures in place in order for the tumor cell to survive. It is therefore critical for these cancer cells to increase antioxidant capacity in order to overcome the oxidative stress caused by ROS during cancer progression.

Grant: 1350-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-3149

Year: 2017

Project Title: Enhancing The Clonal Selectivity Of Current Drug Therapies In Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

Project Summary:

The objective of my proposal is to develop better treatments for patients with a group of blood cancers called myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). There are currently no curative treatment options for MPN apart from stem cell transplantation, which is a high-risk and sometimes life-threatening procedure. 

Grant: 7013-17 | Specialized Center of Research Program (SCOR):

Location:University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5

Year: 2017

Project Title: Therapeutic Implications Of Altered Epigenetics And DNA Damage Responses In Hematologic Disorders

Project Summary:

Acute myeloid leukemia and peripheral T-cell lymphoma are diseases with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Mutations in three genes with similar functions contribute to the development of both of these diseases, but how they do so is unclear. New therapies targeting the effects of these mutations are being developed, but even the most promising of these are likely to be effective in only a subset of patients. A better understanding of how these mutations contribute to leukemia and lymphoma, and how they affect treatment resistance will lead to new and better therapies.

Grant: 5464-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, California 92037

Year: 2017

Project Title: The Impact Of Immunoglobulin Isotype (IgM Vs IgG) On B Cell Lymphomagenesis And Progression.

Project Summary:

B-cell lymphomas continuously multiply because growth regulation signaling is altered to stay ‘on’ all the time. This signaling is normally triggered by activation of proteins called receptors on the cell surface. Most lymphomas require signaling from a group of receptors called the B-cell receptor (BCR). Normal B-cells produce a type of BCR, called immunoglobulin (Ig), in a process called the germinal center (GC) reaction. There are several types of Ig subtypes – IgM, IgG, and IgA isotypes—which are produced during the GC in response to stimuli generated by agents foreign to the body.

Grant: 1352-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:New York University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02241-415026

Year: 2017

Project Title: MicroRNA Regulation Of Leukemia Stem Cells

Project Summary:

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is composed of two populations of cells with differing characteristics. The bulk population directly gives rise to the disease symptoms. The second population is very small and is composed of leukemia stem cells (LSCs), whose role is to initiate disease and generate the AML bulk population. These self-renewing LSCs are therapy resistant and mediate disease relapse; therefore, it is critical to understand the mechanisms that regulate LSCs in order to develop strategies designed with the intent to cure. 

Grant: 3371-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637

Year: 2017

Project Title: Single-cell Technologies To Dissect 5hmC And 5mC Heterogeneity In Normal And Malignant Hematopoiesis

Project Summary:

Blood cells arise from stem cells found in our bone marrow. Through a process called differentiation, stem cells develop into the diverse blood cell types with their various functions. Cells of the same blood subtype are often thought of as homogeneous populations, but this extreme simplification imposes limitations on our ability to understand normal and malignant blood cells. Therefore, it is critical to understand the more complicated reality of blood cell diversity.

Grant: 5472-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:British Columbia Cancer Agency Branch, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3

Year: 2017

Project Title: Roles Of MicroRNA MiR-146a In Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

Project Summary:

Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a cancer of blood stem cells, the blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. In MDS, cancerous blood stem cells lose the ability to make blood cells, and can also block the function of the remaining normal blood cells. Aging and environmental factors are associated with developing MDS, but how these processes affect the function of both cancerous and coexisting normal blood stem cells in MDS remains poorly understood.

Grant: 2317-18 | Career Development Program (CDP):

Location:Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis , Missouri 63130

Year: 2017

Project Title: Targeting Leukemia Stromal Interactions In T-ALL

Project Summary:

T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a subtype which comprises about 20% of all cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. T-ALL is a particularly rare disease in adults, with only about 600 new cases per year in the United States. Furthermore, the prognosis of adults is poor; only 40% of adults with T-ALL are cured with current treatments.