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Childhood Blood Cancer Facts & Statistics

Click on the links below to view statistics about each disease:

 

Leukemia

New Cases, Incidence and Prevalence

  • Leukemia is the most common cancer in children, adolescents and young adults less than 20 years old.
  • In 2014, about 4,103 children and adolescents less than 20 years old are expected to be diagnosed with leukemia throughout the US.
  • From 2007 to 2011, leukemia represented 26.9 percent of all of the types of cancer occurring among children, adolescents and young adults younger than 20 years.
  • The most common type of leukemia in children, adolescents and young adults younger than 20 years is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • ALL is the most common cancer in children and adolescents 1 to 16 years old.

Survival

  • From 2004 to 2010, the five-year relative survival rates overall were 
    • Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - 66.3 percent for children and adolescents younger than 15 years 
    • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) - 91.8 percent for children and adolescents younger than 15 years, and 93 percent for children younger than 5 years.
  • The childhood ALL five-year survival rates have improved significantly over the past five decades

 figure6 - childhood all survival

  • The leukemia death rate for children and adolescents younger than 15 years in the US has declined by 81 percent from 1969 to 2011. Death rates for all types of cancer for children, adolescents and young adults younger than 20, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, declined from 1975 to 2011. Despite this decline, leukemia causes more deaths than any other cancer among children, adolescents and young adults younger than age 20 years.

 

Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

New Cases, Incidence and Prevalence

  • Lymphoma is the third most common cancer in children, adolescents and young adults younger than 20 years.
  • In 2014, lymphoma will account for 10 percent (HL, 4 percent; NHL, 6 percent) of all cancers expected to be diagnosed in children and adolescents younger than 15 years.
  • In 2014, the number of cases expected to be diagnosed in children and adolescents younger than 15 years is 620 for NHL and 380 for HL.
  • Older children and adolescents are more commonly diagnosed with HL than younger children.

Survival

  • Five-year relative survival is 97.1 percent for HL in adolescents and young adults ages 15 to 19 years. Five-year relative survival is 97.6 percent for HL in children and adolescents younger than 15 years.
  • In children, adolescents and young adults younger than 20 years, five-year relative survival for NHL is 83.9 percent. This represents a significant improvement in the rate of recovery. As recently as the mid-1970s, most children and adolescents with NHL did not survive five years after they were diagnosed.
  • For children, adolescents and young adults under 20 years, death rates for all types of cancers combined declined from 1975 to 2011, including for HL and NHL


Source: Facts 2014-2015

last updated on Thursday, January 29, 2015
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