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Facts and Statistics

Leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are types of cancer that can affect the bone marrow, the blood cells, the lymph nodes and other parts of the lymphatic system. These cancers are all related since each are likely a result from acquired changes to the DNA of a single stem cell.

These facts and statistics are the most recent data (2013) from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, Cancer Statistics Review (CSR) 1975-2010. The CSR reports cancer incidence, prevalence, survival and death statistics. For a more detailed explanation of the SEER data, download or order The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's (LLS's) free publication Facts Spring 2014.

Click on the links below to view statistics about each disease:

 

General Blood Cancers

New Cases

  • Approximately every 3 minutes one person in the United States (US) is diagnosed with a blood cancer.
  • An estimated combined total of 156,420 people in the US are expected to be diagnosed with leukemia, lymphoma or myeloma in 2014.
  • New cases of leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma are expected to account for 9.4 percent of the estimated 1,665,540 new cancer cases diagnosed in the US in 2014.

Prevalence

Prevalence is the estimated number of people alive on a certain date in a population who previously had a diagnosis of the disease. An estimated 1,129,813 people in the United States are living with, or are in remission from, leukemia, Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma or myeloma.

Survival

Relative survival compares the survival rate of a person diagnosed with a disease to that of a person without the disease. The most recent survival data available may not fully represent the outcomes of all current therapies and, as a result, may underestimate survival to a small degree. 

5yr Survival Chart

Deaths

  • Approximately every 10 minutes, someone in the US dies from a blood cancer. This statistic represents nearly 152 people each day or more than six people every hour.
  • Leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma are expected to cause the deaths of an estimated 55,350 people in the US in 2014.
  • These diseases are expected to account for 9.4 percent of the deaths from cancer in 2014, based on the estimated total of 585,720 cancer deaths.

 

Leukemia

New Cases

  • In 2014, 52,380 people are expected to be diagnosed with leukemia.

table3 - new leukemia cases

Prevalence

  • There are an estimated 310,046 people living with, or in remission from, leukemia in the US.

Survival

  • The overall five-year relative survival rate for leukemia has more than quadrupled since 1960. From 1960-1963, the five-year relative survival rate among whites (only data available) with leukemia was 14 percent. From 1975-1977, the five-year relative survival rate for the total population with leukemia was 34.1 percent, and from 2003-2009, the overall relative survival rate was 59.2 percent
  • From 2003-2009, the five-year relative survival rates overall were
    • CML - 58.6 percent
    • CLL - 83.1 percent
    • AML - 24.9 percent overall and 64.8 percent for children and adolescents younger than 15 years
    • ALL - 68.8 percent overall, 91.7 percent for children and adolescents younger than 15 years, and 92.6 percent for children younger than 5 years.

Deaths

  • In 2014, 24,090 people are expected to die from leukemia (14,040 males and 10,050 females).
  • In 2006-2010, leukemia was the fifth most common cause of cancer deaths in men and the sixth most common in women in the US.

table4 - estimated leukemia deaths


Hodgkin (HL) and Non-Hodgkin (NHL) Lymphoma

New Cases

  • In 2014, there are expected to be 79,990 new cases of lymphoma diagnosed in the US (9,190 cases of HL, 70,800 cases of NHL).

 table5 - estimated new lymphoma cases

Prevalence

  • There are an estimated 731,277 people living with, or in remission from, lymphoma in the US.
    • There are 172,937 people living with Hodgkin lymphoma
    • There are 558,340 people living with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Survival

  • The five-year relative survival rate for people with HL has more than doubled, from 40 percent in whites (only data available) in 1960-1963 to 87.6 percent for all races in 2003-2009. The five-year relative survival rate is 93.5 percent for people with HL who were younger than 45 years old at diagnosis.
    • HL is now considered to be one of the most curable forms of cancer.
  • The five-year relative survival rate for people with NHL has risen from 31 percent in whites (only data available) in1960-1963 to 71.2 percent for all races in 2003-2009.

Deaths

  • In 2014, 20,170 people are expected to die from lymphoma (1,180 from HL, 18,990 from NHL).

table9 - estimated lymphoma deaths

 

Myeloma

New Cases

  • An estimated 24,050 new cases of myeloma (13,500 males and 10,550 females) are expected to be diagnosed in the US in 2014.

Estimated New Cases of Myeloma

Prevalence

  • An estimated 88,490 people in the US are living with, or in remission from, myeloma.

Survival

  • Five-year relative survival has increased from 12 percent in 1960-1963 among whites (only data available) to 44.9 percent in 2003-2009 among all races and ethnicities.
  • The three-year survival rate as of January 1, 2010, is 56.6 percent.

Deaths

  • Approximately 11,090 deaths from myeloma are anticipated in 2014.

Estimated Deaths from Myeloma

 

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

New Cases

  • For the five-year period from 2006 to 2010 there were approximately 70,615 new cases of MDS throughout the US, averaging an estimated 14,123 cases per year.
    • There were approximately 39,424 cases in males (averaging 7,885 per year) and 31,191 cases in females (averaging 6,238 per year).

Estimated New Cases of MDS

Survival

The SEER program only recently began maintaining statistics for MDS. Prevalence and mortality statistics were not reported by SEER for MDS in 2013 at the time of this publication.

Deaths

Mortality rates were not reported by SEER for MDS in 2013 at the time of this publication.

Source: Facts Spring 2014

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last updated on Thursday, September 04, 2014
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